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Remote control of commercial aircraft
12/25/2007 6:55:55 PM

This is an extremely thought provoking article I found while searching the iternet.  I thought you would find this interesting.

Jim 

Boeing Fitting Aircraft With Illegal Parts?
 

Chip that was illegally installed in 2000 could have been utilized to execute 9/11 attacks

Paul Joseph Watson & Alex Jones
Prison Planet
Wednesday, March 7, 2007

Are Boeing fitting their aircraft with illegal devices that could enable terrorists to remotely hijack airliners and crash them into high profile targets? In light of what happened on 9/11, Boeing's blanket denial that this practice has taken place is both highly suspicious and a threat to national security.

We talked to airline industry representatives to ask them if such technology had been installed in commercial airliners and they denied all knowledge, despite the fact that Boeing were hit with a record fine of $15 million after the company broke the law by selling commercial planes equipped with the QRS-11 gyrochip, which is also used in the guidance system of the Maverick missile.

According to the Associated Press, from 2000 to 2003 Boeing shipped 94 airliners oversees, mainly to China, that contained the chip, a device used for "military applications," stated the report.

According to the Seattle Times, "The QRS-11 chip, made by a unit of BEI Technologies in Concord, Calif., is just over 1-½ inches in diameter and weighs about 2 ounces. It sells for between $1,000 and $2,000. Described as "a gyro on a chip," it is used to help control the flight of missiles and aircraft."

"There could be dozens, even hundreds more components like the QRS11 gyros that have slipped under the eyes of State Department enforcers, said Joel Johnson, the vice president international of the Aerospace Industries Association," reports the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), and "Aircraft incorporating the QRS11 chips are already routinely making flights."

Should it concern us that Boeing began installation of a chip that turns a plane into a remotely guided missile immediately before 9/11?

One month before 9/11, German newspaper Der Spiegel reported that U.S. military-industrial complex giant Raytheon landed a 727 jet six times by remote control using GPS technology at a Hollomon AFB in New Mexico.

In April 2001, aviation history was made when a Global Hawk, which is equivalent in wingspan to a Boeing 737, flew by remote control out of Edwards Air Force Base, across the Pacific Ocean, and landed safely at the Royal Australian Air Force base at Edinburgh, in South Australia state.

Other sources from within the airline industry have told us that such devices were common in aircraft years before 9/11, a remarkable supposition that has led many to suspect that the attacks on the Pentagon and the World Trade Center were executed using this remote access system.

Recent newspaper reports discussing these devices and the policy to have them in all airliners within three years assure us that they would prevent another 9/11 style outrage - but because any such system is vulnerable to hacking allied with the fact that pilots have no way of overriding the autopilot, not even with secure access codes, this only increases the chances of another 9/11 style attack.

A comprehensive investigation on behalf of those who have the authority and resources to perform it needs to be mandated immediately into whether devices that completely remove control of a plane from the pilot and that have illegally been installed in many existing aircraft are a fundamental danger to national security.

 

 

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President Bush addresses aviation issues
11/16/2007 9:18:25 PM

Statement by US President, George Bush, on Aviation Congestion:

“Thanksgiving is November 22, and Christmas will quickly follow. This is really a time of joy for our families. Unfortunately, this is also a season of dread for too many Americans. Holiday travelers faced with the prospect of long delayed and canceled flights and lost baggage, and other problems have become all too often an occurrence. In other words, there's a lot of people that are worried about traveling because they've had unpleasant experiences when they've been flying around the country.

“And so this is a topic that I've just discussed with Secretary of Transportation Mary Peters and the Acting Administrator of the FAA, Bobby Sturgell. It's one thing to analyze the problem, but the American people expect us to come up with some solutions. And that's what we've been talking about. And one of the reasons we have a sense of urgency about this issue is that these problems that we've been discussing are clear to anybody who has been traveling. Airports are very crowded, travelers are being stranded, and flights are delayed, sometimes with a full load of passengers sitting on the runway for hours. These failures are -- carry some real costs for the country -- not just in the inconvenience they cause, but in the business they obstruct and family gatherings they cause people to miss.

“We can do better. We can have an aviation system that is improved. And that's what we're talking about. Secretary Peters and Acting Administrator Sturgell have been working with the airline industry on practical improvements. I want to announce a series of preliminary actions to help address the epidemic of aviation delays:

“First, the military will make available some of its airspace over the East Coast for use by civilian airliners this Thanksgiving. These new routes will help relieve air congestion from Maine to Florida for nearly five full days surrounding the holiday.

“Second, the FAA is taking new measures to head off delays. Bobby Sturgell will impose a holiday moratorium on all non-essential projects, so that the FAA can focus its personnel and equipment exclusively on keeping flights on time. The FAA is also partnering with the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey to reduce bottlenecks in the New York metro area, which is the source of most chronic delays.

“Third, the Department of Transportation and the FAA are encouraging airlines to take their own measures to prevent delays. I'm pleased to get the report from Secretary Peters and Acting Administrator Sturgell. Airlines have agreed to make more staff available to expedite check-in and boarding, to set aside extra seats and even extra planes, to help accommodate passengers affected by cancellations and delays. They agreed to bring in additional ticket kiosks and baggage handling gear, as well as rolling staircases.

“Fourth, the federal government is using the Internet to provide real-time updates on flight delays. People in America have got to know there's a website called Fly.FAA.Gov; that's where the FAA transmits information on airport backups directly to passengers and their families. If you're interested in making sure that your plans can -- aren't going to be disrupted, you can get on the website of Fly.FAA.Gov. As well, if you want to, you can sign up to receive delay notices on your mobile phones. In other words, part of making sure people are not inconvenienced is there to be -- get transmission of sound, real-time information.

“Fifth, we're proposing new regulations to help ensure that airline passengers are treated fairly. We're proposing to double the amount of compensation passengers receive when they're forced off over-booked flights. For example, a passenger forced to wait more than two hours for another flight would receive a minimum of $800 under our idea -- instead of the current $400. We want people who are responsible for moving passengers to understand that there will be consequences for these delays -- all aiming to get the system to work better.

“We're proposing a requirement that airlines collect better data on flight delays -- and provide that data to the Department of Transportation. We're evaluating a number of other recommendations for the airlines, including mandatory contingency plans to aid stranded passengers and penalties for chronically delayed flights.

“Finally, the Department of Transportation and the FAA are working on innovative ways to reduce congestion in the long run. While short-term improvements in flight operation and passenger treatment can help, they do not cure the underlying problem: In certain parts of our country, the demand for air service exceeds the available supply. As a result, airlines are scheduling more arrivals and departures than airports can possibly handle. And passengers are paying the price in backups and delays.

“The key to solving this problem is managing the demand for flights at overloaded airports -- and there are a variety of tools to do this in a fair and efficient way. For example, fees could be higher at peak hours and at crowded airports, or takeoff and landing rights could be auctioned to the highest-value flights. Market-based incentives like these would encourage airlines to spread out their flights more evenly during the day, to make better use of neighboring airports, and to move the maximum number of passengers as quickly and efficiently as possible.

“This concept is called "congestion pricing." It has shown results in other areas of our economy -- in other words, other parts of our economy use congestion pricing. Some states offer discounts to drivers who use EZ-Pass, which reduces long waits at the toll plaza. Phone and electricity companies balance supply and demand by adjusting their rates during peak usage hours. Applying congestion pricing to the aviation industry has the potential to make today's system more predictable, more reliable, and more convenient for the travelers. Over the past seven weeks, federal officials have raised this idea with airlines and airport representatives in the New York area. I've asked Secretary Peters and Acting Administrator Sturgell to report back to me about those discussions next month.

“My administration will work swiftly to carry out the measures I've announced today. But to reform our aviation system in a way American consumers deserve, we need action from the United States Congress. In February, my administration sent Congress an FAA modernization bill that would improve the aviation system for all involved. The bill would upgrade aviation technology -- by adopting a safer and more automated air travel [sic] control system based on GPS technology, instead of the radar and radio-based systems designed during World War II.

“If we really want to solve this problem, it's time for Congress to modernize the

Imagine aircraft parts manufactured in China... considering you can't buy a safe Chinese manufactured toy
10/23/2007 7:39:22 PM

Despite the growing production of regional airliners, with China as a favored site, skeptics remain doubtful about long-term prospects for manufacturing in China, citing past experiences. Airlines worldwide, surviving on slim margins, will find cheaper prices of quality regional aircraft hard to resist. Consequently more and more aircraft parts and even larger aircraft will be built in China over the coming decade, dramatically reshaping aerospace. Still, doubters cite the need for improved quality control and say that the manufacture of entire aircraft and sophisticated assemblies for foreign companies, especially if they seek US and international certification, is still in the future. McDonnell Douglas's troubled assembly programs in the 1980s and 1990s left a lingering, bitter taste.For many it remains proof that anything beyond making small parts in China will deliver losses. Yet McDonnell, seduced by the China dream like many in the past and many to come, was probably pushing China to run before it could walk. Nevertheless, foreign manufacturers have continually expanded, quietly, building a wider range of more complex parts in China. Boeing has sourced parts worth US$500 million from China between 1980 and 2004, forecast to hit $1.3 billion by 2010.

Cheap labor and big sales prospects - the China dream - outweigh the troubles. In late 2002, two decades after McDonnell's program started, arch rivals Canada's and Brazil's Bombardier and Embraer announced they would begin manufacturing their small regional jets in China. Meanwhile, with 41 orders in hand, China is forging ahead with its 75-to-105-seater ARJ21. Embraer seeks to send more work China's way. "The company is currently evaluating possibilities for sourcing certain parts from its Chinese partner Hafei Aviation Industry Co Ltd [HAFEI], in substitution of some imports," says Guan Dongyuan, Embraer China's managing director. "At this moment we strongly believe that our focus should be to consolidate the industrial operations of Harbin Embraer and to satisfy the Chinese domestic market. Nevertheless, future exports are a possibility." Exports of Chinese-made ARJ21s, Bombardiers and Embraers will surely come as China's cheaper labor eventually delivers lower prices, turning heads at airlines overseas. "The first batch will likely be used in China. But it will probably be another two or three years before the quality stamp is up to international export standards," says Ravindran Devagunam, leader of the consultancy Deloitte Deloitte & Touche LLP's aviation and transport practice in Singapore. "I think price will definitely win out. I don't think airlines can afford not to" [pay attention to China's lower production prices]. China sees aerospace as strategic industry Access is one aspect of the complex China equation.

Building in China creates jobs and upgrades skills. That goes down well in Beijing, which sees aerospace - the business of designing and manufacturing aircraft - as a strategic industry, with China's air transport market second only to the US market by 2020. "We believe that the local manufacture of the ERJ145 family aircraft provides Embraer with a competitive edge by providing a well-proven product and by being closer to the customers. According to Embraer's forecast, there will be some 200 aircraft within the 30-to-60 seat category delivered to Chinese airlines in the next 20 years," says Guan.

Orders, sluggish so far, in part due to aviation reform pausing this year, will surely come though, for were these ventures to fail some investors in aerospace and other industries might lose heart, causing headaches for the government, which needs foreign investment to create sorely needed jobs and introduce new technology. Short-term, local production avoids import duties of 24% on small regional jets. However, these are being cut by World Trade Organization (WTO) agreements come 2006. "These taxes are being reduced, and WTO promises to reduce them further still. Unlike Russia, for example, China is an export-driven economy and must carefully adhere to its WTO promises," says Richard Aboulafia, Teal Group's senior airlines analyst.

Manufacturing's migration from West to East will not happen without much kicking and screaming. Tens of thousands of Western jobs will be lost. While that may concern shareholders, ultimately they want greater returns, which moving to China promises. It is a delicate subject manufacturers, judging by Airbus, Boeing and Bombardier declining to comment despite repeated requests, would rather avoid. Down on the shop floor finding a suitable collaborator, politically and technically, in the right place needs careful homework. "The main challenge for the implementation of local manufacturing activity is the selection of the right partner," says Guan, Embraer China's managing director. "Location and infrastructure are other important considerations, especially in light of this summer's power shortage," says Devagunam. Government involvement a plus - or minus Government involvement, although gradually shifting to a more hands-off Western approach, remains significant. "There is still a great deal of government intervention at all levels, which can be supportive, but can also hurt if you are on the wrong team," says Peter Harbison, managing director of the Center for Asia-Pacific Aviation. If all this were not enough, there is another ball in the air for aerospace bosses to juggle: quality.

Improving it is driven in no small measure by China's fast-growing airliner maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) industry, which has seen significant foreign investment and is winning ever-larger shares of business on cost, quality and turn-around times. "Quality control is an issue, but it's not as big an issue as it was," says Devagunam. "If you look at other manufacturing, such as autos, it has improved. But there's a long way to go." Ensuring quality can weigh heavily when it comes to foreign companies producing aircraft in China. "It is, in fact, not always a good economic move to offshore some of that production because quality control can be very expensive. However, progressively these problems will diminish," Harbison says. Balancing these sometimes fiendish challenges are low wages. Just how much can be saved on labor is hard to ascertain, but with salaries accounting for 20-40% of an aircraft's cost, it is not insignificant. Given that aircraft, unlike cars, are still largely hand-built, labor costs will remain an important consideration for years to come. China's fast growing maintenance, repair and overhaul business, along with increasing amounts of high-tech equipment such as mobile phones, computer chips and medical products, all attest to China's manufacturing advantages. "Competitive pricing will pressure manufacturers to move parts production to China. Given China's large skilled workforce, it will be a long time before wage inflation takes hold. This pressure will also force wages down in the West," says Richard Aboulafia, an analyst with The Teal Group in Fairfax, Virginia.

Notably, China will soon nudge Japan and Korea from the top spots in labor-intensive shipbuilding and highly automated automobile production is rising fast in China, largely to satisfy local demand. "When you get down to making parts, aircraft production is not that different to auto production," says Devagunam. China's cheap labor a sensitive topic Embraer's Guan, however, plays down the impact of cheap labor, not altogether surprising given the subject's sensitivity. "Although labor costs are obviously an important element, airplanes do not have a very significant portion of production costs a

StraightAERO announces its commercial aerospace tools
10/5/2007 9:05:29 AM

Straight Aero announces its free commercial aviation parts search tools.  StraightAero was born out of the commercial aerospace parts business.  The tools that parts resellers, OEMs, and repair stations have not been avaialble through easily accessible and economical means.  StraightAero is here to assist with those needs.  We offer several free services such as manufacturer reference and company directory searchs as well as a free community forum to have questions answered around part modification, sales, assistance with part requests, service techniques and general community.  These types of tools are available commercially by other companys such as the World Aviation Directory and AvRef but they are unaffordable to the small to mid market company's that are the foundation to the aviation industry.    

Since we are striving to make this site more user friendly and increase the tool set ... please give us your suggestions in the suggestion area on the forum...

Thank you..

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Airline Fleet Search
10/3/2007 9:27:55 PM
StraightAero rolls out the beta test of their commercial aerospace tools associated with airline fleet search capabilities.  Please feel free to give feed back on this tool through the community forum.  We looke forward to providing next generation tools to help add value to your aerospace business.
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Commercial Aerospace - ECOJET
9/23/2007 5:19:30 PM


One of the biggest challenges the aerospace industry has to over come is the public perception that the sommercial aerospace industry is environmentally unfriendly.  Boeing released the Dreamliner which was boasted to be the 'greenest' commercial airliner.  Now we have the release of the ECOJET.  The budget short haul carrier EasyJet recently unvieled its Ecojet airline model which helped give the aerospace industry a vision of the future.  The most obvious difference between the Ecojet concept and a today's standard airframe designs is the tail section of the airliner.  The aft section of the craft houses two large propfan engines.  These rear mounted open rotor engines provide unrivaled environmental performance for short haul travel.  This comes in the maintenance of these engines which are mounted unter the wing throughfore the rear mounted engine is the best solution.  This unusually designed aircraft was based on designs that Airbus and Boeing had already under consideration.

CFM International and Pratt and Whitney which are powerplant manufacturers admit that they are evaluating open roter engine design alongside traditional geared turbodfans.  The manufacturers both feel that the introduction of traditional geared technology into a open rotor design is possible but aren't positive when it would be available. 

Andy Harrison, CEO of EasyJet, notes that the aerospace technology is available to develop the EcoJet which would be 25% quieter and emit 50% less carbon dioxide.  This could be another great step to providing a 'greener' airline for the aerospace industry.

 

Please note portions of this blog were taken from Airliner World Magazine

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StraightAERO announces its commercial aerospace tools
9/7/2007 10:47:53 AM

Straight Aero announces its free commercial aviation parts search tools.  StraightAero was born out of the commercial aerospace parts business.  The tools that parts resellers, OEMs, and repair stations have not been avaialble through easily accessible and economical means.  StraightAero is here to assist with those needs.  We offer several free services such as manufacturer reference and company directory searchs as well as a free community forum to have questions answered around part modification, sales, assistance with part requests, service techniques and general community.  These types of tools are available commercially by other companys such as the World Aviation Directory and AvRef but they are unaffordable to the small to mid market company's that are the foundation to the aviation industry.    

Since we are striving to make this site more user friendly and increase the tool set ... please give us your suggestions in the suggestion area on the forum...

Thank you

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